Fun Flower Facts

Perennial Flowers that Bloom all Spring Long

April 11, 2018
Hummingbird Feeding at Bleeding Heart Bloom

If there’s one thing that remains a constant in this world it’s that April showers always seem to bring May flowers. With spring fast approaching, many perennials can’t wait to break through their dirt beds and stretch their leaves out in the world.

If you’re looking to save time, money, and energy on your spring garden, perennials are certainly the way to go, because when it comes to the world of flowers, perennials are the gift that keeps on giving. Check out this list of perennial flowers that will bloom all spring long!

Lungwort

Don’t let its less-than-appealing name fool you — lungwort is a marvelous, flowering plant that blooms at the first sight of spring. Starting off pink, lungwort gradually transitions to a dark purple flower, before dying once the sweltering temperatures of summer arrive.

Why We Love Lungwort

  • It’s a strong plant that’s highly disease resistant.
  • Even in partially shaded areas, it flourishes well.
  • Rabbits, deer, and other plants tend to leave it alone.

Flowering Pulmonaria officinalis also known as lungwort

Brunnera

Popping up at the beginning of each spring, it’s easy to see how this plant earned the nickname “forget-me-not.” This glossy foliage is also known as “heartleaf brunnera” because of its many heart-shaped leaves.

Why We Love Brunnera

  • Brunnera loves humid environments and is always thirsty, making it a hard plant to overwater.
  • They’re perfect for north-facing gardens because they don’t need much sun.
  • In more moderate clients, brunnera will last throughout the spring and summer, dying only once colder weather hits.

Brunnera flowers

Bleeding Heart

If you can set aside its somber sounding name, bleeding hearts make a pretty joyous addition to any garden. Belonging to the poppy family, bleeding hearts once only grew in Asia, but can now be found throughout the world.

Why We Love Bleeding Hearts

  • They’re simple to grow.
  • Bleeding hearts grow best in the shade.
  • Their fuchsia coloring easily brightens shaded areas.

Hummingbird Feeding at Bleeding Heart Bloom

Primrose

The minute you see the sun cut through those harsh winter clouds, you’ll find colorful primrose flowers popping up from their long slumber. Found mostly in wooded and shaded areas, primrose is another flower that lasts long into the summer and even fall, in certain areas.

Why We Love Primrose

  • When cared for properly, these beauties will not only return each year, they’ll actually multiply and fill your garden with life.
  • Primrose flowers come in a wide range of colors, many of them even featuring two colors on a single flower.
  • Primrose is hardy and adaptable to most environments.

violet primula with raindrops

Bloodroot

This bedding plant grows well in shaded and woodland gardens. After its flowers start to disappear, bloodroot’s blue-tinted leaves will fall and add a colorful layer to your garden.

Why We Love Bloodroot

  • Don’t worry if you don’t have much room for your newest addition, bloodroot is a non-invasive and not aggressive plant.
  • Bloodroot grows long into the summer in some places (though it will need some shady coverage in the summer).
  • They’re available in single and double-flowered varieties.

Bloodroot flowers growing in northern illinois

Daffodils

Depending on the type of daffodil you have, these flowers can bloom in early, mid, or late spring. This bulb-sprouting plant may only bloom for a few weeks at a time, but they’ll return year after year with the right care.

Why we Love Daffodils

  • They can grow well in full sun or partial shade.
  • Daffodils can take to a wide range of soils, but typically grow best in well-drained soil.
  • Daffodil bulbs can grow in crowded and spacious areas.

Daffodil field in spring

Looking for more ways to celebrate the beauty of spring? Throw a spring flowers party for you and your friends!